Total Performance

Total Performance

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Total Performance

Total Performance is a Cross River Pictures production, written and directed by Sean Meehan. It has a run-time of about 18 minutes

Total Performance
Substituting practicality with emotion
4/5
Total Performance

Total Performance is a Cross River Pictures production, written and directed by Sean Meehan. It has a run-time of about 18 minutes and is primarily a comedy drama. The film was produced in 2015 and just recently caught our eye. The award winning film has a unique premise, unlike anything we have seen in mainstream cinema. But will it suit your Saturday evening? Read on.

First, let’s meet the actors:


Steven Conroy as Tim Madson


Tory Berner as Cori Sweeney


Caitlin Berger as Annie Heron


Timothy J Cox in a special appearance

The film is set in the dystopian present. In the 21st century, where consumerism has reached the heights of lunacy. Consumerism not limited to Gucci purses and Marc Jacob heels, but as an emergency pill in the face of emotional adversity. Total Performance is about our heroine, Cori Sweeney, who is a struggling actress but makes ends meet by working for a very odd company. The company promises to alleviate their clients’ feelings of anxiety before they are faced with some form of emotional conflict.

Suppose you need to fire your best friend from work, but don’t know what to say or how they will react, simply give this company a call, and they will send an actor to you (who has read up on your friend and your premise), and he/she will allow you to play out the entire scene and help you through your catharsis. This will leave you relieved and better prepared to face your subsequent human conflict.

The fact that this concept might not seem completely horrendous to most of us is the reason why Total Performance is such an excellent film. People of the current developed world have begun to see emotion as an obstacle and they believe that practice will make them better at handling it. Because we have lost the ability to differentiate between learning how to ride a bike through rough terrain, from offering empathy to our friends during rough times.

Cori Sweeney however, finds herself in a very unpracticed and a very real human conflict when she is called upon for her services by a very well known friend. Practicality goes out the window when she needs to hide in the bathroom whilst a heart breaks in the next room.

Total Performance is a very well made film. It’s light, has all the necessary quips and quirks. The storyline is tastefully unique and we love how easily the director allows the story to take it’s ultimate shape. Character development is unhurried and the screenplay is on point. The cinematography is a little uninspiring, but is unnoticeable due to the matured performances of all the actors.

Steven Conroy and Tory Berner as millenials caught up in old-world struggles are so very believable. Tory Berner keeps the spark in the film alive with her peppy dialogue delivery and happy smiles, and Steven Conroy is adorable as the lost young soul with a fun side.

As the story unfolds, it begins to masterfully direct us to the underlying message. However, it isn’t imposed upon you and is considerably open to interpretation. For those who aren’t too keen on dissecting a film the way critics do, the film will still manage to appease and entertain them. The film leaves an impression, and will stay with you after it’s decent run-time.

It’s a good film with a strong story, great performances and masterful direction. In case you have some time this weekend, we really do recommend that you watch the film. It’s available on Vimeo, and we will provide a link below. It might give you some perspective about modern relationships and the impracticality of pragmatism in emotion. We give it 4/5.

Here’s a link to the film:

 

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